Notas ao café…

Realpolitik

Posted in notas ao café by JN on Outubro 7, 2009

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Dario Castillejos, «El Imparcial de México»

O Dalai Lama encontra-se em Washington mas não se encontrará com o Presidente Barack Obama. A razão principal será a administração Obama não querer criar atritos com a China antes da cimeira entre os dois países no próximo mês. É a primeira vez que acontece desde 1991, como escreve o Washington Post:

[…] The U.S. decision to postpone the meeting appears to be part of a strategy to improve ties with China that also includes soft-pedaling criticism of China’s human rights and financial policies as well as backing efforts to elevate China’s position in international institutions, such as the International Monetary Fund. Obama administration officials have termed the new policy “strategic reassurance,” which entails the U.S. government taking steps to convince China that it is not out to contain the emerging Asian power.

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Taylor Jones, «Politicalcartoons.com»

Wen Liao, na Foreign Policy, explica esta linha de raciocínio e o pragmatismo (necessário) do Presidente Obama:

Just as a prophet is without honor in his homeland, a holy man is mostly unwelcome in the realm of international realpolitik. In the 50th year of his exile from Tibet, the Dalai Lama is undoubtedly familiar with that unofficial diplomatic wisdom. But the idealists who supported Barack Obama in his presidential campaign received a rude lesson last week when the U.S. president declined to meet the Dalai Lama. The pragmatism that is Obama’s diplomatic lodestar, it seems, comes at a price: Illusions must be abandoned. Publicly recognizing China’s territorial unity is the sin qua non for effective bilateral diplomatic relations, and Obama knows it.

[I]n the wake of the financial crisis of 2008, and given China’s vastly increased importance to global economic stability, the Obama administration must recognize China’s enlarged role in international decision-making. Antagonizing China’s government over Tibet is no way to get it to act responsibly, whether on economic issues or on climate change. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton signaled her recognition of this reality earlier this year when, on her first visit to China, she deliberately avoided the issue of human rights in Tibet.

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Arcadio Esquivel, «La Prensa»

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